Women in Business Focus Group Quarterly Update - Q2

Published on 2014-06-11

In a report based on 14 years of research into female CEOs at 2500 of the world’s largest public companies, Strategy& (formerly Booz & Company) predicts that by 2040 as many as one third of incoming CEOs will be women.

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The celebration of International Women’s Day across the world on 8 March is often used as a backdrop against which to set updates on the progress of gender equality in various contexts - including that of women in the workplace.

In a report based on 14 years of research into female CEOs at 2500 of the world’s largest public companies, Strategy& (formerly Booz & Company) predicts that by 2040 as many as one third of incoming CEOs will be women. For 8 of the last 10 years the proportion of women in the incoming class of CEOs has been larger than the outgoing class indicating that women are becoming more prevalent at this level.

There was another important breakthrough for women in China when recent graduate, Cao Ju, took Beijing-based private tutor company Juren Academy to court after it refused to employ her because she is female. Juren Academy later settled for RMB30000 in what has been described as the first gender discrimination lawsuit of its kind in China.

Elsewhere, a new book entitled “Leftover Women” written by Leta Hong Fincher, an American journalist-turned-academic postulates that women’s rights in China are regressing. Her research shows that in 1990 urban Chinese women’s salaries were 78% of the level of men’s pay. In 2010, that had decreased to 67%. The female urban employment rate also fell, from 77% in 1990 to 61% in 2010.

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